ELECTRONIC PORTFOLIO
DISTANCE EDUCATION CLASS

©2003, HELEN C. BARRETT, PH.D.

MODULE 1 - INTRO

MODULE 1.1
Getting Started & Introductions

MODULE 1.2
Literature & Portfolio Planning

MODULE 1.3
Software & Development Process

MODULE 1.4
Developing the Digital Archive

MODULE 1.5
Reflection & Evaluation

MODULE 1.1

GETTING STARTED & INTRODUCTIONS

Welcome to this course on creating electronic portfolios using common software tools. Dr. Helen Barrett has designed this course around her five stages of electronic portfolio development, allowing you to sample a variety of tools and strategies for publishing a portfolio in electronic format. This first module will allow you to make some initial decisions about what kind of electronic portfolio that you will develop, and build an initial portfolio using common software tools (Microsoft Word and Excel).

You will need to have the following software for this first Module: Adobe Acrobat Reader, QuickTime Player, and Microsoft Office (Word and Excel). The only textbook for this class is Dr. Barrett's CD-ROM, Standards-Based Electronic Portfolios plus access to the World Wide Web.

In this section, we will get to know each other through discussions and each of you setting up a student web page in Blackboard (or provide a link to your own website if you have one). We will look at sample electronic portfolios, both on the class CD-ROM and on the WWW. We will also discuss the role of portfolios in different professions today.

1. In this module we will learn about: (Objectives)

2. We will: (Activities)

3. Reading Assignment: (links below on Dr. Barrett's website) Optional readings are for those taking the course for graduate credit. NOTE: The readings are provided as background for some of the assignments and provide a wide diversity of resources on electronic portfolios. There are no tests on this material and participants may choose which readings are most relevant to their situation in those marked "optional". Treat the optional readings like a buffet: take as much as you can handle and come back for more later when you don't feel so stuffed.

4. Written Assignment: Bb

5. Progress check-list:

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MODULE 1.2

Literature on Portfolio Development, Standards and Portfolios, Planning

In this section, we will look at the literature on portfolio development, the different purposes for portfolios, the role of standards in assessment portfolios, and begin your own planning process. There is a planning worksheet on the CD in Word format that you will use to guide your planning. After the first reading and the video clip, begin working on your personal plan. We will discuss the use of portfolios at different age levels and then will address your personal plans and how we can help each other.

There is also an Introductory Reading that covers some principles of self-directed learning about personal computers in a distance learning class. Much of this information was part of Dr. Barrett's 1991 dissertation and most of it is still relevant today. There are also online readings that are part of the literature on electronic portfolios.

1. In this module we will learn about: (Objectives)

2. We will: (Activities)

3. Reading Assignment: Optional readings are for those taking the course for graduate credit.

4. Written Assignment: Bb

5. Progress check-list:

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MODULE 1.3

Selecting Appropriate Software & Stages of EP Development
Stage 2: Archive Creation/Digital Conversion

In this section, we will address Dr. Barrett's "5-by-5 Model" of electronic portfolio development which covers both the stages of electronic portfolio development as well as five levels of software, depending on ease of use. There are two basic directions in creating electronic portfolios: using a web-based data base (either commercial or developed by an educational organization) -- a customized systems approach (CS); or the use of common software tools to create an electronic portfolio -- generic tool (GT). This class covers the variety of generic tools that can be used to create electronic portfolios, and will guide you through the process of selecting which software tools best meet your needs.

Now that you have determined the purpose and audience for the portfolio you want to create, it is time to start collecting the digital artifacts and figuring out where you will store the artifacts. Our activities over the next two weeks will focus on Stage 2, Developing the Digital Archive (Archive Creation and Digital Conversion). You will look at issues of digital storage and where you will store your working portfolio. You probably already have a lot of your documents in digital form, if you created many of them with a word processor or other software.

You may need to build skills in digitizing images (we will address audio and video in a later module). You will need to have access to some type of graphics editor to do simple graphic manipulation. You might have access to some of the Adobe graphics products (Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, or Photo Deluxe). The shareware program Graphic Converter is supplied on the CD for Macintosh OS9 with links to download a similar version for Windows users.

1. In this module we will learn about: (Objectives)

2. We will: (Activities for this week and next week)

3. Reading Assignments: (over the next two weeks)

Resources for hands-on activities: (Review only if you need help in each area)

4. Written Assignment: Bb

5. Progress check-list:

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MODULE 1.4

Stage 2: Archive Creation/Digital Conversion
Creating the Portfolio Production Documents

In this section, we will discuss the different types of artifacts that you can collect, and the types of media that best convey the story of your portfolio. A resume is also an important part of a portfolio. Include your resume in your archive; if you don't have one, use the Wizard or Templates in Microsoft Word to create your resume.

The electronic portfolio that we will create requires two organizing documents: our collection of artifacts and our reflections on meeting our outcomes, goals or standards. We will begin to work on creating a list of our artifacts, using Excel. We will create the frameword for our Reflective Portfolio using Word. An explanation of the Excel and Word documents can be found online. There are screen recording videos on the CD where I show you how to use these tools. If you can't figure out what the print instructions mean, look for RED boxes in the text of the Handbook. Clicking on those boxes will play the video clips.

1. In this module we will learn about: (Objectives)

2. We will: (Activities)

3. Reading Assignment:

Resources for hands-on activities

4. Written Assignment: Bb

5. Progress check-list:

Were you able to finish your planning worksheet and post it based on your instructor's directions in the weekly e-mail? Have you read other plans in your group and given them some feedback and helpful suggestions? Have you figured out what type of media you want to use in your portfolio? Do you have a good idea of the type of technology you need to support the type of media you have selected?

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MODULE 1.5

Stage 3: Reflective Portfolio, Captions

In this section, we will begin to look at reflection, and the important role of reflection in meeting the purpose you have chosen for your portfolio. We will create captions for each of the artifacts in your portfolio. We will also begin to create an evaluation rubric for assessing the effectiveness of our portfolios, by reviewing several rubrics, both on the CD and on the WWW (only if you are not taking the second class/module).

In science, reflection is a bending back of light on itself. A mirror image is enough like the original so as to be recognizable, but sufficiently different to cause one to examine the familiar from a new perspective. (Tuchon, 1999)

1. In this module we will learn about: (Objectives)

2. We will: (Activities)

3. Reading Assignment:

If you are NOT taking the next module, then you will want to know how to evaluate electronic portfolios. The following topics will be covered in Module 2:

4. Written Assignment: Bb

5. Progress check-list:

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©2003, Helen C. Barrett, Ph.D.